What's Causing Your Rash? 8 Common Skin Conditions and How to Treat Them.

 

What's Causing Your Rash? 8 Common Skin Conditions and How to Treat Them.



What's Causing Your Rash? 8 Common Skin Conditions and How to Treat Them.


Do you have a rash? It could be one of the following skin conditions:


Eczema: Eczema is a type of inflammatory skin disorder. There are three types of eczema, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Eczema most commonly appears on the hands and feet but can also appear on other areas like the scalp or face.


Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH): DH is an autoimmune disorder that results in blistering skin lesions along with itchy, dry skin. People who have DH typically experience severe itching all over their body. The itchiness occurs mostly at night and is often worse when it's cold or dry outside.

Blisters: Blisters are small fluid-filled bumps that can appear anywhere on your body after you've been out in the sun for too long.


Pityriasis Rosea (PR): PR is a common condition that begins with.


Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, and Seborrheic Dermatitis)

Eczema is a type of inflammatory skin disorder. There are three types of eczema, atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Eczema most commonly appears on the hands and feet but can also appear on other areas like the scalp or face.

Atopic dermatitis is an allergic condition that usually starts in childhood. If left untreated, it can lead to secondary infections. Symptoms include redness, scaling, dryness, crusting, cracking of skin, itching and blistering.

Contact dermatitis occurs after direct contact with an irritant or allergen. This is often caused by poison ivy or oak plants, nickel in jewelry or metal zippers, tar from asphalt shingles on roofs, chemicals found in some cosmetics and perfumes.

Seborrheic Dermatitis is a type of eczema that develops in oily areas of your body like your scalp or trunk of your body. It causes red patches with yellow scales on the outermost part of your skin where there's more oil production (and the hair follicles are located).


Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH)

Dermatitis herpetiformis is a type of dermatitis that causes itching and blistering. Itching is often worse when it's cold or dry outside, and can occur anywhere on the body.

DH is caused by an autoimmune disorder which results in a blistered rash. Experiencing severe itching all over your body with DH typically occurs at night, when you're in bed, and might be worse when it's cold or dry outside.

In addition to having a blistering rash, people with DH also experience the following symptoms:

- Red bumps appearing along the skin

- Brownish bumps on the skin

- Overproduction of skin cells

- Skin lesions like eczema


Blisters

Blisters are small fluid-filled bumps that can appear anywhere on your body after you've been out in the sun for too long.

You may get blisters on your fingers, hands, feet, face, or any other area of your body. Blisters are often caused by direct exposure to the sun (particularly when you're using sunscreen) or to something like poison ivy or oak.

Skin injuries like cuts or burns can also cause blisters to form.

Depending on how bad your skin is affected, blisters come in different colors and sizes. Most blisters are small but some can grow bigger than a quarter in size if they're not taken care of early enough.

The fluid inside the blister comes from the skin underneath it and is mostly clear with a yellowish color. If you have a severe blister, it may have bits of dirt or gravel embedded in it which could lead to an infection.


Pityriasis Rosea (PR)

Pityriasis Rosea is a skin condition that usually appears during the spring or fall. It's most common in adolescents and young adults, but it can affect people at any age.

Here are five things you should know about PR:


Pityriasis Rosea usually starts with a single patch of pinkish-red skin, which gradually extends to form a large, scaly rash on one side of your body. These patches often itch, but not everyone experiences itching.

The rash spreads quickly—on average, it takes three weeks for it to go away completely. It usually takes about two months for all the symptoms to go away.

It's rare that this rash will reoccur after the first occurrence (though it may happen).

Some people develop additional symptoms like headaches or fever along with their rash; these symptoms typically stop when the rash begins to disappear.

A doctor can diagnose Pityriasis Rosea by looking at your skin and asking about your medical history and other symptoms you might be experiencing.


Conclusion

With so many skin conditions out there, it can be hard to know the cause. However, with a little bit of research you can find the best way to treat your specific condition.

You may be surprised to find that you're not alone in this battle. Skin conditions affect people of all ages and backgrounds, and not just those who are stressed or have a compromised immune system. Knowing what it is that's causing your rash is key to treating it.

1. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis, Contact Dermatitis, and Seborrheic Dermatitis)

2. Dermatitis Herpetiformis (DH)

3. Blisters

4. Pityriasis Rosea (PR)

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